5 Steps to Help Prepare for a Medical Job Interview

Medical Job Interview TipsSummary: Going into a career in the medical field usually requires countless hours, time, money, and education to adequately prepare you to meet qualifications and experience. However, preparing for the job interview can make sure that all the time and energy spent does not go to waste. Taking some simple steps will help you make the most of the hard work you have gone through.

First, learning everything you can about the job you are interviewing for will help the interviewer know you are prepared for the job and you can feel confident to answer any job specific questions. Next, having an understanding about the medical field and the institution you are planning on entering will be key to showing your passion and desire for the job. Furthermore, conducting mock interviews with colleagues and mentors will help you feel more prepared to enter the interviewer-interviewee dynamic. Next, relate all answers to current healthcare practices. This will show the interviewer that you are up-to-date on all current practices and techniques. Finally, come to the interview prepared with recommendations, medical related experiences, and a full understanding of your strengths and weaknesses. Moreover, using your medical resources will help you find the right job for you and the drive to get the interview and put your best foot forward.

Original Article: How to Prepare for Job Interviews in the Medical Field

Entering the medical field usually follows multiple years of intensive educational preparation. During the interview process you must present a professional image and impress potential employers with your knowledge, expertise and abilities. In the medical field, trust and communication skills are vital, and should be exhibited to their full extent during the interview process.

Step 1

Learn everything you can about the position you are interviewing for before your meeting. You should be able to find out the job requirements in advance through the organization’s human resources department by requesting a detailed job description. Having this information will help you tailor your interview responses based on the type of medical field job you’re interviewing for.

Step 2

Familiarize yourself with the medical practice or healthcare organization and its principles in advance. For example, learn about a medical practice’s history, areas of specialty and patient types. If you’re interviewing for a laboratory or research position, learn about an organization’s current research projects and upcoming studies. Much of this information can be gleaned from the organization’s website. You can also search for news articles that feature the organization or its leaders.

Step 3

Conduct mock interviews with a trusted friend or colleague. Record the interview so you can evaluate your performance. Have your friend ask standard interview questions about your education, your areas of healthcare specialty, previous work history, awards and recognitions and publishing credentials. Your goal is to establish smooth and complete responses to key interview questions, without sounding like you have rehearsed them in advance.

Step 4

Formulate responses to potential questions related to current healthcare industry trends. Be prepared to discuss your philosophy on issues such as patient advocacy, maintaining patient confidentiality, healthcare insurance issues and your perceptions on changing healthcare practices. Brush up on recent developments in medical treatments, drugs and technologies so your interviewer will know you are aware of the importance of staying up-to-date in a constantly evolving field.

Step 5

Come prepared with personal letters of recommendation from reputable professionals in your particular area of medicine. Present these to the interviewers along with your resume.

Source: http://work.chron.com/prepare-job-interviews-medical-field-17156.html

Disclaimer: This article was shared for informational purposes only. ACHT is not responsible for any claims, advice or errors that might exist in the articles. Third party websites or analysis presented.